Eileen&Tarpley 01112020.mp3 transcript powered by Sonix—easily convert your audio to text with Sonix.

Eileen&Tarpley 01112020.mp3 was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the latest audio-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors. Sonix is the best audio automated transcription service in 2020. Our automated transcription algorithms works with many of the popular audio file formats.

Eileen:
Hello, Tarpley. Hello Eileen. This is, um, an amazing turn of events when I think about meeting you over twelve, thirteen years ago. That's right. All right. And a lot has happened. A lot has happened in my life and yours indeed in that period of time. And we've had a, uh of a range of relationships, but it feels just plain delightful to be here with you doing this. You know, for me, theatrical thing, I think of you as the one comfortable with the theater, and yet this just feels like a compelling opportunity and I really appreciate your willingness to jump in and help me launch the Listening for Life podcast.

Tarpley:
Oh, I'm delighted. I feel by. I feel honored to be asked.

Eileen:
So in art, and there's so many ways to to start and to proceed. But when I move my chair to. You know, how do you said. You just said it again. You know, once a psychoanalyst, always a psychoanalyst, I mean, it's a world view.

Tarpley:
It is a world view. Tell me what you mean. Well, I think that. When people think, oh, you're a psychoanalyst, that just means that you were, you know, wedded to a particular doctrine and you have people lie on your couch and listen to them free associate, and that's what you do during that hour. And I would hasten to add that it's more a mind frame and I listen the way that I listen to a patient. But I listened that way to everything that, you know, informs my day from reading the newspaper to talking to my children, to talking to friends. I'm not psychoanalyzing them, but I'm curious about, you know, about what they're up to. What are what are they discovering? What's new with them? What does it mean? How do they feel about it? That's kind of the bread and butter of psychoanalysis anyway, in my view. What what things mean to you and what. And how you feel about.

Tarpley:
Huh? How you feel about all of it?

Eileen:
That's exactly what I was going to ask you to say more about. I mean, listening how? Like, I'm thinking again about our purpose here is to take this conversation we have and we have with our colleagues all the time and try to open it up and make it available to the world beyond our circle. So you say, you know, it's a way of listening. Like, it's not easy to put it to language that someone who hasn't been on the road, on the trip or the trek of learning to listen in a psychoanalytic way would understand. I mean, how can we try to explain what that is?

Tarpley:
Well.

Tarpley:
I'll try not to be long winded here, but I always do verb.

Tarpley:
Refer back to the training that I had before I became an analyst because I started my life wanting to become an actor. And over the course of my training as a psychoanalyst, I was always.

Tarpley:
I don't know.

Tarpley:
Kind of amazed that the process of becoming an actor, playing a part, creating a character is very similar to working as an analyst in the following way. Acting is about relationships. It's about engagement between people. So is psycho analysis. It's about engagement. It's about listening to people, not waiting to speak. It's about listening and responding to what has been said. Acting is about portraying complex people who are in conflict, which is the way every human being is. Not just people who were created on a stage for people to look at, but. I think that that's what I listen for, I listen for conflict. I'm struck by complexity. This person has has this element of their character and then they have another part, another side to them that is in conflict with that particular way of seeing themselves. So that's that's what I mean. I'm the engagement part, the listening part is. Paying attention to. What is important to this person in this moment? And you know, I'm not just listening to a story, I went to the grocery store and, you know, I bought milk or whatever. Even if that is what somebody is saying to me, I'm listening, wondering why this story about going to the grocery store is so important to them to tell me right at this moment. Are they trying to pass the time? Are they trying to show me how put a good homemaker they are? You know, it could have so many different meanings. So rather than say, oh, they're just telling me this because they don't want to talk about something else, I pause and say, let me just listen a little more and see if we can find out where this is going. Somebody goes on and on about going to the grocery store. I might interrupt at a point and say we know this obviously is very important for you to tell me. Right. And you're at some pains to be very specific about this trip to the grocery store.

Eileen:
How did you say it just before we started recording? People say, how do you stand giving people advice all day? The kind of listening that you're describing and I know I mean, it's it's know what we aim to do, but that's very different. It's very different than we out giving advice. Yes. Yes. I mean, you're really listening. And obviously with a with. Not just a capacity, but with it a depth of interest in you to other people. Yes. You don't want just the surface it. You want to know what the meaning is.

Tarpley:
I do. And another clue to what the meaning is, is I pay attention. I listen not only for the content, but the way the person is delivering the content. In theater, it's called peopIe. I pitch pace and intensity, which if you were to watch a character on a stage or you know, or or on TV movie. You wouldn't. You're not consciously aware of help, but the person might be feeling. But you're going to be speaking differently if you are in tremendous distress than you would be if you're not. And that would be shown by the pace of your language. The pitch of your voice pauses, interruptions. As a matter of fact, there is a whole school in psychoanalysis of I think it's called close process monitoring, where that's not all the analyst is doing, but they pay attention specifically to changes in the patient's voice tone or they're talking along and all of a sudden they stop talking. They clear their throat. They swallow. They fall silent. You know, in that moment, something is going on inside emotionally for them that has interrupted the flow of their words. I may not know what that is exactly, but I can since I'm listening for it, I can comment on it. Something like. I noticed that just in that moment. You. You paused and you actually clasp your hands. And I wondered, can you tell me what was how you were feeling right in that moment? So that is another way of listening, is not just listening to the words, but also seeing if you're sitting across from somebody, you can see their body language, but you can see that if they're lying on a couch as well. Mm hmm. It's not like they're invisible to you. You're not, you know, close to Hausen.

Eileen:
Again, you're just you're really listening for what the person is communicating that is meaningful for them. And using every means available to you. Visual, auditory, whatever. What you sense an end to it. I get what's happening, what's not happening. And that's at a depth and a detailed level. That is not common, right? Who lives their life this way? No wonder people on the one hand are drawn to and and excited to be paid attention to on the other hand. It's it can be a little frightening to have someone tracking at the level you're describing, where you're aware of something. Maybe not even they're aware.

Tarpley:
Yes. Yes.

Eileen:
How do you read the signals like this feels in waiting to be listened to by you? This way or you're scaring me. I wonder.

Tarpley:
Well, I think I'm just reflecting back on people who people's comments about. My if they're sitting across from me and they can see my expression, I I do not have a poker face. And so if I am. Policed. I think it's going to show if I'm angry. I think it's going to show and people call me on that, which they should. And, you know, I invite people to.

Tarpley:
No comment on on on how they are experiencing me, and I have had people say, you listen. You're listening as if. I'm the most important person in the world, and that feels good, but it also is a little scaring me a little bit because I'm not that interesting a person.

Tarpley:
But.

Tarpley:
I believe I am. I have always been since I was a child, interested in other people. Huh. It's just sort of. I've always been I've always been curious about other people.

Eileen:
A real part of you and a real natural part of you. I just found myself wondering, as was as we're sitting and I you said theater. And I know that you've you know that the psychoanalytic life has been. And I was trying to track which came first. But but but two sides of a coin. What you know, Drew, you originally to study theater and psycho analysis at the level that you felt drawn. I wonder like when you think personally. Interest in other people. Is clear, but is it? Am I intruding when I say is there is. Was there some more personal reason or purpose that you felt compelled to pursue? The theater and psycho.

Tarpley:
Yes, indeed. I think for the theater. Actually, I was about 10 years old before I realized that my father was a business man because I thought my parents were actors, because their social life was a repertory community theater in the town where we grew up and they were always being in plays and the family activity was going to the theater. And, you know, I and then later, my brothers, after they were born, you know, handing out, you know, Coca-Cola to the actors during their breaks and so on. But I was mesmerized by them. You know, I love watching my parents become other people in the dressing room, having their makeup put on and seeing them on stage behaving in ways they never behaved in real life. And I knew that they would, but I knew that there was something real about it because they studied their characters.

Tarpley:
I remember, for example, going with my father once sitting on a park bench across from the police station because he had been cast as a policeman in an upcoming play. And he wanted to get a sense of how the policeman interacted with each other, the camaraderie and how they put their hand over their billy club. You know, debate, you know, did they you know, not you know, did they josh each other with their elbows or what did they eat? I mean, you know, he was very thorough and had some of that kind of detail. And then when when I became a little older, I started to audition myself and got cast in plays and was in plays with both of my parents. And it was just it was just very exciting. So we would always sit around. What's this character thinking? How do you think they feel before they're saying this line? Or, you know, characters don't just appear on a stage. They come on to the set because they're coming from someplace else, just like patients coming into our office. They're not just appearing there. They've come from somewhere and they bring whatever their last stop was into the room with them.

Tarpley:
So that was.

Tarpley:
Anyway, that was how I became interested in editing. What an orientation to the world. I mean, it was it was marvelous. So prose, it sounds magical. It was yeah.

Eileen:
It was good when you were 10. You discovered your father was a businessman. Was that a letdown?

Tarpley:
You know, I have to say, I don't remember. I just remember. I don't. My parents are movie star. Yes. I can't. You know. And that wasn't all you learned more.

Eileen:
But yeah, but that. But that too in that first. So tell me just to Segway back then, how did you decide to pursue, you know, training and second.

Tarpley:
Well that came later and it came.

Tarpley:
There was kind of a calamity in my personal life that had to do with death and severe illness of family members. And that happened when I was quite young and I was in my 20s and that was the end of my stage career. I then it meant I had to prepare myself to earn a living. And but because of that event in my life, I didn't know anything about mental health, particularly I or psychology. I mean, I just didn't know. As a profession, I just didn't know what they did. And I grew up in a kind of small town. And there was one psychiatric hospital, except everybody knew what it was, was a drying out spa. I don't know that they had sick psychiatric patients, but it was a place where you went if you were alcoholic or needed, you know, a 28 day program. And so that was the only thing I knew about mental health. And then when these various tragedies in my family occurred, I realized I needed help and I didn't know what I needed. And so, fortunately, I was delivered into good hands. Bye bye. You know. People who white, who I knew, neighbors and whatever, who got me the name of a psychiatrist, but I had no idea what they did and I didn't know how I could be helped.

Tarpley:
But I was. You know, I became a patient and I was a patient for a number of years. I was seen intensively at that time because of the level of my distress. But it worked in that, you know. I. I. I got pieced back together and in a way that I felt like I was a better version than I was before I ever, ever had. My my. That's a big outcome. Yeah, it was a it was a big outcome. And so I needed to earn a living. So I decided I wanted to be like my my my analyst right now. This was, though, in the early 70s, and that was impossible unless you go to medical school. But I was already too old to go to medical school. I was 32 and the cutoff for medical school applicants at that time was 28. So I thought, well, I can't become an analyst, but I could become a clinical social worker. So I did. And then, you know, I had, you know, post-graduate training and had jobs and whatever.

Tarpley:
And then along around the mid 80s, it became possible for social workers to apply for psychoanalytic trading. And I did. Huh? And was accepted as a candidate in 1988. So that's how keep evolving that things just kept evolving. Yeah.

Eileen:
At every level. But I'm imagining that. Then you had the experience of being listened to. Yes. Ended it specifically and meaningfully fruit for yourself. Yes. Personally and and in in your real world in a way that was indelibly, positively affecting. So it makes sense that it felt meaningful for you to pursue that as well. As we've talked before about a world view, you know, that having trained. And I wonder again if there's a way to say simply or meaningful, like what it means to train to become an analyst. Because being a patient and being a receiver is one thing. Yes. And being, you know, you know, moving through the training is like a whole another kind of a process.

And.

Tarpley:
Can you say something a little more about the experience of that?

Tarpley:
Huh? I'll tell you what just came to my mind. This is a free association to what you just said. What popped into my mind was the story of Pippi Longstocking as her pipi. As you recall, her brother was dead. She was. A latency age child somewhere between 6 and 10. And her mother had died, but not in childbirth.

Tarpley:
She had had a mother and the father was a sea captain and he went off to sea and left her there to take care of the house by herself. And she did it. And there would be times where something would come up and she didn't quite know how to navigate and she would remember what did. What would my mother do here? How would my mother handle this, whether it was, you know, the cow kicked over the milk or, you know, the cat got up on the roof. Pipi had to be resourceful, but she took in her training to be a competent adult by what she internalized from her.

Tarpley:
Grow from her parents. She became like them. And I would say in my training the coursework was excellent by the supervision was excellent. I think would push gov- came, come, came to shove. The bottom line was it was my experience as a patient. In my early 30s and then an analysis again when I was in my late 40s. That is what I draw on from moment to moment in my chair appearance itself.

Tarpley:
The experience itself for yourself. Yeah. Yeah, the experience. What I. What I recall working for me. It just became like it became internalized just like Pipi. Oh, I know what mother would do. And she'd go get the mop and mop up the milk.

Eileen:
You know. It's such a simple and yet such a complex thing, isn't it? Because it's not intellectual. It's not academic. It's not just practical. Hands on. It's something about being. Yeah. And listening and paying attention to what's happening in the moment. And I wonder how it feels to be in this experience with me. I'm still a little trying to shed some of that self-consciousness about what we're doing right here. How how are you making out?

Tarpley:
I'm I'm okay. I mean, the longer it goes on, the more comfortable I am where it's like. Yep. You know, we're just.

Eileen:
Yep. Set away. And it feels so excellent and so valuable to be talking with you. Tarpley and really talking with you in a way that can be captured in this recording and then used in a way I really appreciate the way you're bringing sharing yourself generously and honestly. But also your artistry. You know, the thing that has struck me, I've told you before and I want to tell you again that you don't in my experience, you're. You're not just the ad, an analyst whose reasoning things you're really drawing on, your experiences, all kinds of experiences in life to to reach for what feels meaningful and what. And then I want to bring in the word what feels alive. Yes. You know. And that that's what's meaningful. You know, I I remember being in class with you and it felt very alive. It wasn't just cerebral. I appreciate you answering me with the story of Pippi Longstocking. You know, we we we both know what it is to take in and take in a quality of experience that then sticks with you where you're not as alone or not as unknowing as you were before, even though every moment, every person, every country, like you were saying earlier, is new. Just like this experience of this podcast is new. The launch of a of a new journey.

Tarpley:
Yeah. Well, speaking of alive. Yeah. Yes. The thing that I think people. Generally don't think of when they think about theater. Like if they go to a full stage play.

Tarpley:
Is that it's entirely improv, improvised, even though you have a script and you know your lines. So the line does not exist until you hear somebody say it. So, boy, do you have to listen, because if you're a partner drops a line, you can't sit there and just say. Hey, hey. Come on. What's what's the line here? Right. Improvisational. And I feel that is what happened. That's what makes it so alive. Night after night after night after night, no performances is exactly alike. They're always props don't appear. And you have to just do something else. It's all improv. And that is what an analysis is. It's moment to moment improvisational. You can't sit there and say, wait a minute, what would Freud say in this instance? Does it should I be interpreting from the super ego or whatever? Dead, right. Just dead. Right. And you're not flying by the seat of your pants either. Improv is not a fly. Just anything goes. It means you're paying attention and listening. And in the moment and if you are, it doesn't matter whether your actor says your partner, scene partner says the right thing or not. You're going to respond to whatever it is they do say. And it's gonna be real because you're there with them playing with whatever you have just received right. As it is in a clinical setting.

Eileen:
You know, this is what I imagine. You know, it's hard for people who haven't had the experience of dynamic analytic therapy like we know it. They can imagine what or it or can they, you know, is there some way that we can share and explain it? Or is it just something that needs to be experienced because. I'm reminding myself that editing is a part of this process. So just let those concerns go. This the business of what? What's going to make this podcast alive, how is it that we can use these conversations? I go in thinking to myself, too, to bridge to the world beyond our community, like, how can you share an experience that just needs to be experienced to be known?

Tarpley:
You know, well, that's a good question. It reminds me of the old saying, when somebody is trying to explain something to another person and then they end up saying, never mind, you just had to be. They are.

Eileen:
Exactly. Exactly. Exactly. And yet everybody knows what it is to, you know, be be a self, you know, be a self trying to make a make meaning and purpose out of their lives. You know it. But this is the point. This is what we're trying and trying to convey. So let me ground it another way. Are you practicing currently or you're traveling?

Tarpley:
No. I closed my practice. OK, cause I'm gone so often that it would not be fair to people.

Eileen:
Is it? Can I ask you about the decision to discontinue practicing and to begin to travel the world? Yes.

Tarpley:
You may.

Tarpley:
When I had my 70th birthday at that, my party, people said any retirement plans? And I said, nope, not me. I'm never going to retire. I love my work too much. Then my seventy fifth birthday loomed and I thought, OK, I've got three choices. I can just continue and die in my chair. I can continue to practice and indulge until I get sick.

Tarpley:
Then I'll just have to close my practice any way or I can retire at seventy. While I still have my marbles. I still have energy and embrace other things that I also enjoy doing. And I'm just looking around. I am aware that between 70, the age of 75 and 80, everybody starts to look a little worn.

Tarpley:
And I thought, not you. I thought I got I I.

Tarpley:
I just want to make sure that I've got the energy to do the kind of travel I want to do. And I also want to get back and do some theater again before I can't do it anymore. So I have. So that's what I've done for the past four years. I am right now currently in my 80th year of life. If I had known, I would feel this good. I probably would not have retired at 75. But you never know. Sure, you just don't know. And what I did not want to do was to suddenly just tell all my patients, I'm sorry. This is our last session because I've got to leave for cancer treatment. I just simply did not want to be in that position.

Eileen:
Right. Right. So. Right. So speaking of alive, the process goes on and on and building on the experiences you've had before you lived your practice. For how many years? Forty five. Forty five is a big round number. And and the and the process continues. Yeah. It goes on. It had choices. And you made your choice in favor of life and the way that you described traveling and greeting each country as if it were a new patient. Yes. Is fascinating as well to tell me that story again about how how you know about my dreadful.

Tarpley:
Well.

Tarpley:
I I travel generally by myself, even though I'm always with people when I'm traveling. Because you just because I start most of my days in a new country going to free walking tours in English and there, you know, you learn some things. You meet people, you find out of the things that they've done. And I just like the on the spot, the spontaneity of it. I I just like that. I don't want to just read a bunch of books, see pictures of what I'm going to say. Get on a plane and arrive and go see what I've just seen in the books. There's just no element of surprise or spontaneity to that. And I've done a couple of trips like that. Not recently. Not I'm not in the last five years. But, you know, 10 years ago, I would go on tours and I thought, but I've seen this in a book. I mean, yeah, it's nice to see it, but I want to see something I haven't seen before. Show me something that I haven't seen before. So that's the way that I approach travel. I read enough about a country to know something about it, but I don't, you know, read an exhaustive number of books on the book on the country. I just go and, you know, I end up seeing things that I think the country is known for in one way or another.

Tarpley:
And then when I get back, I read more in-depth about things that I I have seen and.

Eileen:
And you go on experiencing the world from the vantage point of a psychoanalytic. Worldview I do where you're looking for meaning in listening for meaning and experiencing in an alive in your experiencing of the encounter. Yes. Letting it show you let the encounter.

Tarpley:
I want the country to show me about itself. Reveal yourself to me, huh? Because it's the first time you've revealed it to me. If I reveal it to right. People who have written about it. But I haven't seen it. And I want to. I want to I. That's what excites me, is to be able to see something and have. And be alive in the moment rather than show up saying, okay, oh, this is the that. OK. Now, I've seen that. Check. You know, now we get on the bus and we go someplace else and we see another. Why? Okay, check. We see that.

Eileen:
What? You know, Tarpley sitting with you again. I want to say it seems like, you know, being alive and. And following the path of your own experience has been an organizer. I know as an organizing principle in your lifetime. Yeah. And one step has led to another and it feels, you know, very rich, very meaningful. And building, you know, one on another and and and sitting with you. I mean, it's just a real pleasure to see and feel the aliveness in you and the path you go on. You know, cutting and excuse me to know that that includes. Depths of exploration. You know, maybe you use the word calamity, and that's a beautiful one. It's like you've you've known your own conflict, your own complexity. Yes. And hit a certain kind of wall earlier on. And and and found a way. If with good help, it sounds like. But to explore the depths within you, you know. And having done that, it it felt meaningful to you making a way to make a vacation out of that and a way to make a profession. Yeah. Out of that.

Tarpley:
You know, one thing that has. I don't know how it came when I when I was a patient for the first time.

Tarpley:
And this was 1968 and the year Martin Luther King was killed. Or. Yes, absolutely.

Tarpley:
Yes. Washington burned, OK? Yes, yes, yes, yes. That is it. We're here in D.C. I was here.

Tarpley:
I was here in D.C., but I. When I went in for therapy.

Tarpley:
I was suffering, and I think most people come to see a clinician because they are suffering and because of that, I've always considered the people who I treat to be patients, not clients. Because the definition of a patient is one who is suffering. And I just I bridle at the idea that my people who I work with, who come to me, who are suffering are clients. I just that word has never sat well with me.

Eileen:
So appreciate your your your describing it that way. And tell me something. Tell me what that word means. More of what you mean by the word suffering.

Tarpley:
Suffering. Meaning.

Tarpley:
Oh, that's a good question.

Eileen:
I know what it it is an important word, I'm. I totally agree with you. And I know that tension between the use of the word client patient often enough I've used the word people in person because I don't want to be forced into either one. But I really appreciate that's the meaning of the word suffering.

Tarpley:
Yeah. I think that what I mean by suffering is. Generally. People, in my experience, call because something has happened that is just awful or something is about to happen. That is awful. Somebody is dying or somebody has died or they've lost the love of someone they love. Or they've you know, they've been fired from their job or something. I mean, they're in complete distress. They are in extreme suffering is comes about when one is in an extreme circumstance. They're not worried. That's why I use that. I think suffering to me means above and beyond having just a bad day. That it with sustained it's it interferes with your functioning. You're not sleeping as well or eating as well or you know, you're preoccupied again.

Eileen:
What I'm appreciating is that you're really crediting, you know, events in life, you know, things that happen in the in the world and in the world of individuals having great impact. And I think one of the stereotypes of of psychodynamics, psychoanalytic theory and practice is that people are afraid you're going to get inside their head and you know it and interpret them in a way that is poised toward the negative, you know, or the unreal. And and and many people in the field focus on depths of theory. And sometimes we can get lost in it. But what I'm really appreciating about what you're saying is that in a very human way, you know this there's a reason for the depth of the work we've learned to do. There's a reason for the depth of this worldview that isn't just there to give advice. It is there to listen and to listen to the suffering. Yes. Whatever it takes to get someone to a suffering place, their psyche, if you will, their emotional makeup, their you know, their beginnings, their background, their, you know, might play a part to set the stage. But the actual experience of suffering, being overwhelmed, being in pain, being lost, confused, some sense this is I guess I'm answering my own question, what is suffering? But, you know, at some level that the the tools I thought I had that worked or the self I thought I knew or the, you know, lay of the land of relationships that make me feel secure in the world are not what they thought they were. And I'm needing help.

Tarpley:
Yeah. Well, just listening to what you said.

Tarpley:
Somebody ask me.

Tarpley:
What the goal of an analysis floor's.

Tarpley:
And.

Tarpley:
A bit has. I think it has to do with just what we're talking about suffering. Well, you said what what what what is suffering? I think suffering is when you cannot bear the way that you feel. And I see that as the goal of. A treatment is to bear what previously was not bearable. And that is what I would say is my role. Not giving advice, but. As as a person. That's why the power of having the experience of being in analysis or in psychotherapy. I feel that I became able. To bear what was previously unbearable in terms of how I felt. Which enables me to be with people who cannot bear how they're feeling because I can help, they become able to stand how they feel as well. What I mean by with standing is without resorting to destructive action to themselves or to somebody else.

Eileen:
This feels spot on and so important being able to bear and then as you're saying, saying it back with me, I'm thinking this is why it is hard to talk about this and put it into words because it is so utterly personal, so utterly idiosyncratically what for one person might be, you know, walk in the park, write for another person is a complete devastation. Yes. You know, and who's to judge. Right. But you put that so succinctly, how someone feels. For themselves able to bear and not bear. And exactly right. You can't make someone else bear for themselves, but you've learned to bear for yourself. Yes. And you're not meeting with someone else to assume a position of power like you're above them or you know better than them or you're stronger than them? No. You know what it is to be your own human being to. Right. And to have dealt with stuff. Yes. That what felt unbearable and became bearable. Yes. And beyond bearable. There's the business of going on making a creative, meaningful life. Life for yourself. Yes. Which is what you're going on doing. I feel like what's happening now is, honestly, I. I myself have had some missteps here and there and I'm trying to get out of my own way and out of my own head and just be here with you.

Eileen:
You know, remembering that we have editors, we have it Britain. Don't worry. Let it go, you know.

Eileen:
But I have to tell you that it almost brings tears to my eyes, like what has just transpired, you know, over the whole course of this conversation, but especially in these last couple of of bits that have evolved a way to have that. Have you say that, you know, that that to think about what suffering is, even when you said, well, that's a good question, let me think about that. And I feel I'm still fighting that self awareness of what we're doing. But I also feel alive in what we've been doing. And like what's evolved here is something that really matters. You know, that I really look forward to making a way to have the world here. So let me ask you. Let's let's prepare to pull to a close and let me just ask if is there. I wonder if if anything has surprised you in the way that this discussion has meandered or have you.

Eileen:
Has a bet. Oh, it's been.

Tarpley:
It's been intimate. It's felt very intimate. We're not at a. Conference grandstanding and saying our theories and, you know, huh?

Tarpley:
It just feels it just feels very real and very personal and very down to earth.

Tarpley:
And I. I do. I know. I think.

Tarpley:
I mean, your. You've got another career coming up. You can be an interviewer.

Eileen:
We'll Tarpley. This is the point. And again, I thank you so much for jumping in here. It's me. And, you know, we'll see how it goes. This, too, is a journey. Yeah, and it's a launch. So stay tuned.

Eileen:
You might be back. OK. All right. All right.

Automatically convert your audio files to text with Sonix. Sonix is the best online, automated transcription service.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Manual audio transcription is tedious and expensive. Quickly and accurately convert your audio to text with Sonix. Get the most out of your audio content with Sonix. Sometimes you don't have super fancy audio recording equipment around; here's how you can record better audio on your phone. Automated transcription is getting more accurate with each passing day. Are you a podcaster looking for automated transcription? Sonix can help you better transcribe your podcast episodes. More computing power makes audio-to-text faster and more efficient. Do you have a lot of background noise in your audio files? Here's how you can remove background audio noise for free.

Sonix uses cutting-edge artificial intelligence to convert your mp3 files to text.

Sonix is the best online audio transcription software in 2020—it’s fast, easy, and affordable.

If you are looking for a great way to convert your audio to text, try Sonix today.